Celebrate mana whenua

Recognise and celebrate the role of mana whenua and increase the visibility of Māori culture and history in the city

Māori whānau, hapū and iwi, as part of Wellington’s history, present and future, are an important part of the city’s identity. Overall, about 8 percent of Wellington City’s population is of Māori descent.

Taranaki Whānui ki te Upoko o Te Ika (Taranaki Whānui) are the recognised iwi collective that includes Te Ātiawa, Ngāti Tama, Ngāti Ruanui and Taranaki interests in the area known as the Port Nicholson Block, which includes Wellington City. Ngāti Toa is also acknowledged by the Waitangi Tribunal as having mana whenua interests on the south-west coast of the city.

Mana whenua status acknowledges the customary authority of these iwi groupings within the Port Nicholson boundaries and the ongoing connection that they have with the land.

Public spaces, buildings, artworks and events provide opportunities to reflect the city’s relationship with Māori. Acknowledging sites of historical importance will make visible to all Wellingtonians the role of Māori whānau, hapū and iwi in the development of the city.

Wellington hapu and iwi have an important partnership role in the long-term cultural, social, economic and environmental wellbeing of the city, and work actively to pursue these interests.

Wellington needs to recognise and celebrate the role of mana whenua and increase the visibility of Māori culture and history in the city by:

  • Using public spaces, buildings, artworks and events as opportunities to celebrate and reflect the city’s relationships with Māori.
  • Acknowledging and identifying sites of historical importance to Māori.
  • Acknowledging mana whenua and Wellington whānau, hapū and iwi as important partners in the future cultural, social, economic and environmental wellbeing of the city.